Tag Archives: exhibition

Oxford Studio Tour

May 6 & 7 is only two weeks away!  Some of you may have taken the opportunity to drive around the countryside of Oxford County, Ontario in previous years, so you know what a fantastic selection of original art can be found.  You also know how much fun a daytrip or weekend jaunt like this can be if you pair up with a friend or family member, or gather a carload of them.  We have 18 locations featuring 38 artists, and our brochures are available all over the county in libraries, tourist offices, and businesses, as well as at each studio.  Admission is absolutely free, and all you do is follow the maps and the red signs to get to each studio.  Then you just wander in!  The artists will be there to answer any questions you have (we love when you ask questions), and will leave you alone if all you want to do is enjoy the feast for your eyes.

Below is a small sampling of my own art, in case you are new to it.  I paint traditional subject matter with watercolours and I also do fractal art, all on various surfaces.  Thanks for reading and I hope you’ll stop by my open studio/gallery, at the back of my home which is Location #3.  I’m in Otterville, which is a little off the beaten track for many travelers but it’s worth the drive.  I’m easy to find, on Main Street near the historic mill and waterfall.  And my good friends Sue Goossens and Rhonda Franks, whose work I admire very much, are nearby at Location #4, along with Ashley Beecraft.  I’ve never met her but she makes really cool looking ‘misfit beasts’.

See you soon!

Lianne Todd Art Samples

Oxford Studio Tour basic information

Under the Milky Way

There’s a new juried show opening, at the Elm Hurst Inn in Ingersoll, ON.  It’s called Spectacular Skies.  The title of the show immediately made me think of the night sky: in particular, the night sky in places where light pollution hasn’t destroyed the ability to see the Milky Way in all its glory.  In spite of so many nights away from cities, I’ve yet to really see the night sky in its full splendour, and I hope to do that someday.  I was pondering where, in the world, might be a good place to do this, and my mind went back to this lovely and somewhat isolated cottage at Glen Coe in Scotland.  While thinking about all this during a car trip, I happened to be listening to SiriusXM’s 1st Wave channel, and ‘Under the Milky Way’ by The Church came on.  Complete with bagpipes mid-song.  So, that settled it, I was definitely going to paint this scene.  I dug out my photos of the cottage, changed the composition a little (the photos were taken from a tour bus), imagined it at night, with the Milky Way above it, and got started.

I photographed my work as it progressed, and put all the photos together in this little video.  I hope you enjoy it.  If you’d like to see the framed finished piece, which is a full sheet watercolour on paper (22×30″), it is hanging at the Elm Hurst until May 17.

Opening night at Paint Ontario

If you haven’t been to the Paint Ontario exhibit in other years (I hadn’t) this is really an exhibit worth driving to.  Such an amazing array of really good art portraying so many aspects of Ontario life.  Some really large pieces, some quite small…. mine fell somewhere in the middle, size-wise.  Maybe I should paint larger more often – the large pieces have such an impact.  I loved all the bright colours in many of the pieces, and some of the innovative mixed media.  Very inspiring.  I was also especially glad to see some watercolour pieces winning awards – and congratulations to all the award winners regardless of medium!  I don’t know how a juror would be able to choose, it must have been very difficult.

Anyway,  here is a little picture of me with my two pieces.  I was really happy they decided to hang them together.

Paint Ontario

I recently entered the juried show Paint Ontario with two of my paintings, and to my great delight, they both were chosen for the show.  I’ve certainly been painting Ontario for a long time but this was the first time I’ve entered – partly because it’s a bit of a distance from my house to the venue, and in other years there wasn’t the option of entering online via digital photo – you had to physically bring the painting.

Aside:  In the olden days 😉  juried shows often had you send slides of your paintings.  Remember slides?  And there was special tape to crop the slides with so that only the painting showed in the projection…

Anyway, the digital age is here and I’m really glad.

The two paintings I have in the show are ‘Four Chairs’ (which I posted in ‘A Beautiful Fall’) and a new painting ‘Resting, Killarney’, which I haven’t posted anywhere yet.  I think I will wait to post it.  I like to have people see the real painting first, sometimes.

Opening night is March 10 (this Friday) from 4-9 pm.  Admission is free for the opening night, and there is a cash bar.  Here is an invitation to the exhibit itself:

po_inviteacceptednight2017

Tour Story

A friend of ours who happens to be a good writer and photographer put together a story with a picture for us.  Pretty nice, huh?  Looking forward to this weekend!

“Discovering artistic inspiration can be a combination of search and being open to unexpected rescue.
Professional Otterville-area artist Sue Goossens regularly sources its vibrant interpretation through natural scenes from The Muskokas to British Columbia, but has also found it in patterns of light and shadows along the edge of a woods in her own rural backyard.
“We can forget Oxford County is a beautiful place to live and find inspiration.”
It can also strike in the most unlikely of circumstances, tangible and imagined potential represented in an abandoned farmstead igniting a creative spark.
“In a sense, it was kind of finding something in the middle of nowhere,” said Tabitha Verbuyst whose route to an unrelated destination happened to coincide with a derelict house surrounded by a few trees in the middle of a field, stark solitude speaking silently to her through shattered windowpanes.
“I’ve always been drawn to the architecture of broken, abandoned and forgotten things,” she explained of a resultant mixed-media piece in ink and watercolour. “It always intrigues me, you wonder what happened, what stories are there here?”
There is no definitive roadmap to inspiration but the 9th Annual Oxford Studio tour does provide one to a wide-ranging exhibition of the county’s artistic community’s creative minds, spirit and processes Saturday, April 30 and Sunday, May 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.
Thirty-one artists are sharing their passion and vision in an event which from inception has been a tour of artists, driven by artists who this year are displaying works including oil, watercolour, acrylic, coffee and walnut ink, and mixed-media paintings, sculpted, thrown and decorative ceramic works, unique and functional stoneware, artisanal jewellery in precious metal clay, gold, sterling silver and precious stones, fine-art photography reflecting international travel or exploring Oxford’s own rural scenes, to ‘funky, folky’ creations from a potter with a passion for primitive rug hooking, and woven creations featuring fibre, beads and paint.
“The common denominator is artistic creativity,” says Deb Beard, General Manager for Tillsonburg’s Station Arts Centre, as well as an exhibiting potter. “You will see diversity in the type of media and types of work presented and because of that, people will be able to connect with various artists through work on different levels.”
Tour participants tend to be a mix of newcomers and returnees says Beard, mostly day-trippers who may visit half the tour’s artists one year and half the next. They represent a wide demographic as well as range of ages. Those seeking physical roadmaps can find them via the tour’s website www.oxfordstudiotour.caor on glossy full-colour flyers including brief bios and contact information for each artist.
Flyers have been distributed from Toronto to Windsor and as far north as Owen Sound, and are available at the Station Arts Centre, Tillsonburg’s Annandale National Historic Site, Ingersoll’s Creative Arts Centre, the Woodstock Art Gallery, Woodstock Library and Tourism Oxford at the Woodstock Quality Inn and Suites, Museum London and Panache Gallery, libraries or art centres in London Westmount, Paris, Dundas and Stratford, the Glenhyrst Art Gallery in Brantford, as well as a range of retail outlets in those communities. Interested persons may also call 519-842-6151 for more information.
Geographically, artists are exhibiting from New Dundee in the county’s northeast, Thamesford in the west to Tillsonburg in the south as well as many points in between, which provides mixed challenge and opportunity.
Heather Benton was a newcomer to the county five years ago when she took her first Oxford studio tour.
“I’m a city girl and from a city girl’s perspective, Oxford looked like a lot of flat land – and then you realized there are all sorts of back, country roads. The tour took us into farms, country houses, little hamlets, it wasn’t just discovering art, it was discovering Oxford County.”
Participating artists are very friendly, very welcoming, says Benton, who felt ‘no pressure to buy.
“A nice introduction to the artistic community and certainly a beautiful introduction to springtime in Oxford.””

Some of my artist friends outside the Station Arts Centre.

Some of my artist friends outside the Station Arts Centre.

Oxford Studio Tour next weekend

It is that time of year again and the studio tour begins one week from tomorrow!  I usually blog about it before this, so I apologize if this is the first you are hearing about it.  We do have posters and brochures out all over the place, and banners as well.

This year we have thirty-one artists on the tour at seventeen locations, so it’s a little more manageable than other years.  Spring is finally here to stay and Oxford County’s fields are really greening up.  You are in for a nice drive if you do venture out to see us.  As usual, I’m at my home in the south end of the county.  Here’s a map of the tour – I’m the purple pin near the bottom, Stop #6 on the tour, in Otterville.  It takes about 45 minutes to get here from south London, 40 minutes from Brantford, 30 minutes from Simcoe, Ingersoll, or Woodstock, an hour from Stratford, an hour from Hamilton, an hour from Kitchener/Waterloo.  So, a pretty nice day trip from a lot of locations!

I have new art to show and I’m excited to have the opportunity to meet more new people who have never seen any of my art before.

One piece you won’t see at my gallery is this one, which I’ve finally finished and which is being delivered today to the couple who received a gift certificate for a commissioned piece for their wedding.  They took the reference for it on their honeymoon.  I wish them many happy years enjoying the memories that will reside on their wall!

Venice 2015. Watercolour on Paper. 15x22". Lianne Todd. Commissioned.

Venice 2015. Watercolour on Paper. 15×22″. Lianne Todd.
Commissioned.

Highland Afternoon

One of the things you get accustomed to as an artist is that your work will be admired, critiqued, awarded, found wanting, rejected, accepted, purchased, or left on your gallery wall.  You never know what a viewer is looking for when they gaze at your work.  It’s why an artist has to stay true to what and how they, in their hearts, want to paint.  You can’t please everybody all of the time, so you have to just please yourself and hope for the best.  That said, we all have egos and those can sometimes be fragile.

I recently entered the IWS Canada Biennale exhibition which is occurring in Vancouver this summer.  As you may know, I am one of the IWS Canada Co-Representatives.  Our country head decided it would be best if we had the jurors choose all of the paintings that would be exhibited, rather than the often customary invitation of country branch heads to exhibit without jurying.  I thought this was a good way to go about things – fair for everyone.   I really only wanted my work to be there if it was juried in, anyway.  So the digital images – over 500 of them from all over the world, were assigned numbers and ranked by three excellently qualified independent jurors on a number of criteria.  Only 175 were allowed in the show.

As it turned out, my painting Highland Afternoon did not make the cut.  I was disappointed, naturally, but not crushed, as I knew the competition would be tough.  I am not sure who applied and who didn’t apply to the Biennale, but I learned this morning that I am in very good company when it comes to rejection from this exhibit.  Apparently there were many, not on the list of 175, who may have fully expected acceptance.

I am really proud of us as an organization, that we are moving towards fairness, away from politics, and ensuring very high quality exhibits, showcasing the best of watercolour art from around the globe.   I congratulate all of the participants who made it on to that list of 175, and I look forward to being inspired by their beautiful work!

I am also very happy that I now get to show this painting instead of keeping it under wraps until July.  I really like it.  It’s true to the vision I had of it in my mind, and I completed it fairly quickly because I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it.  I feel that it exemplifies a variety of effects you can achieve with watercolour.  It is what, and how, I wanted to paint.

HIghland Afternoon. Watercolour. 20x27". Lianne Todd. $900.00

HIghland Afternoon. Watercolour. 20×27″. Lianne Todd. $900.00